Marshmallow Crème - ☺♥

Marshmallow Creme

Here is a simple recipe for making lots of great marshmallow crème at home. Why make it? The cost is far less and the quality much better than commercial stuff. It was quite difficult finding this recipe on the Internet … I had to go to the third or fourth Google® page of web sites to find one that wasn’t simply trying to sell the finished product! So, tell me why the retailers web sites are shown first even though my search specifically included the word "recipe?" Hmmm …

Ingredients: (makes approximately two quarts)

3 egg whites

2 cups of light corn syrup

½ tsp. of Salt

2 cups of confectioner’s sugar

1 tbsp. of Vanilla extract

Directions:

Combine egg whites, corn syrup and salt in a large mixer bowl. Mix for a full ten minutes, first on medium speed for one minute, then at a higher speed. After ten minutes the mixture should look like marshmallow crème. Keep mixing and add the vanilla. Then reduce the speed and gradually add the confectioner’s sugar and then mix at a high speed for one or two minutes, or longer.

The actual volume of marshmallow crème that you get will depend on how long you beat it at high speed, for some air is incorporated and the longer you beat the product the more air you will get. Thus, the final volume can vary from 1½ to 2½ quarts.

Spoon the marshmallow crème into one quart canning jars, tighten the lids and refrigerate. I use a wide mouth canning jar funnel to keep the marshmallow crème away from the top of the canning jar while I am filling it.

The marshmallow crème is great on sundaes or in making ice cream, smoors, etc. It will keep well in your refrigerator for more than a month. Eventually some of the corn syrup will collect at the bottom of the jar … you can still use the product but I recommend making a fresh batch for optimum quality.

Some people add one envelope of dissolved Knox® unflavored gelatin to the above recipe to make a stiffer marshmallow mix suitable for placing on a cookie tray that has been coated with confectioner’s sugar. The stiffened mixture is dusted on top with confectioner’s sugar and cut into squares the size of marshmallows. Then the marshmallows are removed and dusted on the remaining sides with confectioner’s sugar and stored in a cool place. I prefer the marshmallow crème … just imagine a nice hot cup of cocoa on a winter day with a big dollop of marshmallow crème on top … Yum!

As you will see when you read my ice cream recipes, I use the marshmallow crème in two of them, and it is perfect for that use.

è Your local supermarket will charge between $2.50 to $3.00 for a pint container of light Karo® syrup, which was the corn syrup I used to use to make this recipe and my recipe for butterscotch candy. Then I saw light corn syrup at Fisher’s Country Store® and the price was $4.84 for a half gallon! Need I say more?